Who am I?

I am Becky, an Astrophysicist at Stanford University in California. I was previously an NASA Einstein Postdoctoral Fellow and am now a Research Scientist. I'm the one turning towards the camera in the pic above.

Many small kids want to grow up to be an astronaut, I guess I've never grown out of that.

My research is on the role of super-massive black holes in the evolution of the most massive galaxies in the Universe. My colleagues and I are trying to understand how super-massive black holes and their galaxies grow up together, and what other processes might be responsible for driving or possibly stunting the growth of both the galaxy and its central super-massive black hole.

Background.

I was born and educated in the United Kingdom, in Surrey which is a county just south of London. I attended the Ashcombe co-ed state school and later Selwyn College, Cambridge. In both of which I was fortunate to meet many truely wonderful friends to whom I owe a great deal. I studied for my masters and Ph.D. degrees at Cambridge University in the UK reading Natural Science, speicialising in Physics and then Astrophysics respectively.

Teaching.

I first encountered teaching as a Ph.D. student supervising undergraduate first year physics in Cambridge for all three years of my degree. Whilst a serious time commitment (we supervise every week of every term) I throughly enjoyed supervising and mentoring and my teaching philosophy was well shaped by this experience. At Stanford I've guest lectured in three courses and mentored graduate students.

Hobbies.

I love all things sporty and particularly football (the one where you use your feet ;-) ). I played every sport I could at school, rowed as a college student and am currently thoughly enjoying learning to kickbox! My other interests are reading, games nights and enjoying a cold beer with good friends.

Research.

Many of these pages contain snippets of mine and my collaborators current research. In particular I am leading two data-rich projects; one on super-massive black holes in galaxy clusters; the other on the X-ray properties of massive galaxies. I hope you enjoy reading my site!